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Posts for tag: oral health

By Briarcliff Center for Esthetic Dentistry
March 12, 2014
Category: Oral Health
Tags: oral health   oral hygiene  
FiveGuidelinesforImprovingYourYoungstersOralHealth

Young children are like sponges, soaking up patterns of behavior they will later apply in many circumstances throughout life. In this learning process, they often look to family members for guidance. Some good habits, like saying “please” and “thank you,” can be taught verbally. Others are best learned by example.

Developing good habits early will benefit your children for a lifetime — especially where their health is concerned. Fortunately, it isn't hard to instill good oral hygiene behavior in a young child; for example, most all children are successfully taught to brush their teeth at an early age. What follows are some tips that might not be as obvious, but will help your children build healthy routines for maintaining optimum oral hygiene.

1) Teach your children how to check the cleanliness of their own teeth.

How? By running their tongue over the tooth surfaces! If the teeth feel nice and smooth, they're likely to be clean, too. Remember to give kids a soft brush, and tell them to use gentle strokes in brushing.

2) Avoid transferring your own oral bacteria to your children.

Children aren't born with decay-producing bacteria — they get them from others! That's why sharing baby's spoon or licking a pacifier clean aren't really good ideas. (Neither is pre-chewing a baby's food, despite what some birds and celebrities do. Trust us on this.)

3) Set an example of healthy eating habits for your children.

Follow common-sense guidelines (like those in www.choosemyplate.gov) for maintaining a balanced diet, eating plenty of vegetables and whole grains, drinking lots of water and getting moderate exercise.

4) Limit sugary treats to mealtimes, not snack times — if you allow them at all.

Oral bacteria utilize sugar for energy and when they metabolize it, they produce harmful acids. These acids attack the teeth and cause decay. The more sugar, the higher potential for stronger acids. Saliva helps neutralize these acids — but not if sugar is constantly present in the mouth. Try to limit sugary treats to mealtimes, and serve a healthier snack between meals.

5) Encourage your children to stop sucking thumbs and pacifiers by age 3.

Thumb sucking is a normal, comforting habit that may begin in the womb. Most kids stop on their own between ages 2 and 4. But long-term sucking on fingers or a pacifier can lead to tooth and jaw-development problems. We can help you find ways to gently encourage children to stop when it's time.

If you would like more information about instilling good oral hygiene habits in children, please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation. You can also learn more about this topic by reading the Dear Doctor magazine article “How to Help Your Child Develop the Best Habits for Oral Health.”

By Briarcliff Center for Esthetic Dentistry
January 08, 2014
Category: Oral Health
Tags: oral health  
DentalMetalsPoseaLowRiskofAllergyAmongMostPeople

In modern times, metals have played an important role in tooth preservation and restoration. From the dental amalgam used for a century and a half to fill cavities to the titanium alloy of dental implants, your dental care would not be as comprehensive as it is today without them. But could these metals, so important in providing oral health, cause an allergic reaction in some people?

An allergy is an exaggerated response of the body’s immune system to any substance (living or non-living) it identifies as a threat. The response could be as minor as a rash or as life-threatening as a systemic shut-down of the body’s internal organs. An allergy can develop with anything, including metals, at any time.

A low percentage of the population has an allergy to one or more metals: some surveys indicate 17% of women and 3% of men are allergic to nickel, while even fewer are allergic to cobalt and chromium. Dermatitis patients seem to have a higher reaction rate, some allergic even to metals in jewelry or clothing that contact the skin.

Dental amalgam, an alloy made of various metals including mercury, has been used effectively since the mid-19th Century to fill cavities; even with today’s tooth-colored resin materials, amalgam is still used for many back teeth fillings. Over its history there have been only rare reports of allergic reactions, mainly localized rashes or moderate inflammation.

The most recent metal to come under scrutiny is titanium used in dental implants. Not only is it highly biocompatible with the human body, but titanium’s bone-loving (osteophilic) quality encourages bone growth around the implant’s titanium post inserted into the jawbone, strengthening it over time. But does titanium pose an allergic threat for some people? One study reviewed the cases of 1,500 implant patients for any evidence of a titanium allergy. The study found a very low occurrence (0.6%) of reactions.

The conclusion, then, is that the use of metals, especially for dental implants, carries only a minimal risk for allergic reactions and none are life-threatening. The vast majority of dental patients can benefit from the use of these metals to improve their oral health without adverse reaction.

If you would like more information on metal allergies with dental materials, please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation. You can also learn more about this topic by reading the Dear Doctor magazine article “Metal Allergies to Dental Implants.”

By Briarcliff Center for Esthetic Dentistry
December 31, 2013
Category: Oral Health
Tags: oral health   oral hygiene  
SeekingReliefFromBurningMouthSyndrome

There are some people, particularly women around the age of menopause, who experience an uncomfortable burning and dry sensation in their mouths most of the time. The exact cause of this condition, known as “burning mouth syndrome,” is often difficult to determine, though links to a variety of other health conditions have been established. These include diabetes, nutritional deficiencies (of iron and B vitamins, for example), acid reflux, cancer therapy, and psychological problems. Hormonal changes associated with menopause might also play a role.

If you are experiencing burning sensations and dryness, please come in and see us so we can try to figure out what's causing these symptoms in your particular case. We will start by taking a complete medical history and getting a list of all the medications you are taking as some drugs are known to cause mouth dryness. We will also give you a thorough examination.

In the meantime, here are some ways you might be able to get some relief:

Give up habits that can cause dry mouth such as chronic smoking, alcohol and/or coffee drinking, and frequent eating of hot and spicy foods.

Keep your mouth moist by drinking lots of water. We can also recommend products that replace or stimulate production of saliva.

Try different brands of toothpastes, opting for “plain” varieties that don't contain the foaming agent sodium lauryl sulfate, whiteners, or strong flavoring such as cinnamon.

Keep a food diary of everything that you put into and around your mouth (including food, makeup and personal care products). This might give us some clues as to what's causing your discomfort.

Check with us about any medications you are taking, either prescription or over-the-counter. We can tell you if any are known to dry out the mouth and maybe help you find substitutions.

Reduce stress in your life if you possibly can. This might be achieved through relaxing forms of exercise, joining a support group for people dealing with chronic pain, or seeking psychotherapy.

If you have concerns about burning mouth syndrome or any other type of oral discomfort, please contact us to schedule an appointment for a consultation.

By Briarcliff Center for Esthetic Dentistry
December 20, 2013
Category: Oral Health
OralCareTipsforyourToddler

Caring for a young child can be overwhelming at times. Sometimes, it may feel like you can't read enough books to learn the correct way to do everything from potty training to feeding. It's also important to teach your child healthcare habits during these crucial years, so that they continue these habits for a lifetime!

Here are a few simple ways you can help your child to institute lifetime oral care habits.

  1. DO: Encourage your Child to Brush Every Day with Fluoride Toothpaste. Fluoride will help make your child's teeth more resistant to tooth decay. You should use a thin smear of fluoride toothpaste for children under age two and a pea-sized amount for older children. At age two, you can also begin empowering your child to brush, but make sure that you supervise and finish the job. Your child will probably need your help until around the age of six.
  2. DON'T: Share your Germs. Did you know that children are not born with the bacteria that cause tooth decay? In fact, the bacteria are transmitted to them from adults! You should never share a cup or spoon with your child. Also, next time you kiss your child, kiss him or her on the cheeks instead of the lips. Believe it or not, you can transmit harmful bacteria through this quick little kiss.
  3. DO: Limit your Child's Sugar Intake. When your child consumes sugar, the bacteria use the sugar to produce acids that dissolve tooth enamel, eventually leading to tooth decay. Saliva can neutralize those acids, but it needs enough time, 30 to 60 minutes, to work its magic. That is why it is important to limit sugar intake between meals.
  4. DON'T: Give Your Child a Bottle at Night. Juice, milk and even breast milk contain sugars that promote tooth decay, in particular during sleep, when less saliva is being produced. So, though it may be tempting, do not let your child go to bed with a bottle.
  5. DO: Take your Child to the Dentist Early. The American Academy of Pediatric Dentistry recommends that all children have their first dental visit by the age of one. Your toddler will benefit from regular dental visits, because we will monitor tooth decay, correct brushing techniques and also, most importantly, ensure that he or she is comfortable in the dental chair.
  6. DON'T: Allow your Child to Suck His or Her Thumb Past Age Three. Thumb sucking for comfort is a very normal behavior for babies and toddlers. However, if your child constantly sucks his or her thumb past the age of three, it can affect teeth alignment and jaw development.

If you would like more information about oral care for your child, please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation. You can also learn more by reading the Dear Doctor magazine article “Dentistry and Oral Health for Children.”

By Briarcliff Center for Esthetic Dentistry
December 12, 2013
Category: Oral Health
Tags: oral health   oral hygiene   brushing   flossing  
HowDoYouKnowIfYoureBrushingAndFlossingYourTeethCorrectly

You've probably brushed your teeth every day since early childhood when your parents handed you your first toothbrush. But do you really know if you're doing it effectively and removing disease causing bacterial plaque or biofilm? Let's take a look at the basics of tooth brushing.

What is the goal of brushing and flossing your teeth? While it is true that brushing your teeth freshens your breath and removes stains from the surfaces of your teeth, the principal goal of tooth brushing is to remove dental bacterial plaque. This biofilm grows in the nooks and crannies of your teeth, and especially at the gum line — regardless of what you eat or drink. If left on your teeth, this bacterial film can cause gingivitis (inflammation of your gums). It can progress to periodontal disease, affecting the supporting bone of your teeth and even result in tooth loss. This means that flossing should also be an important part of your daily dental hygiene routine to remove plaque from the protected areas between your teeth.

Can you actually brush too much? More is not always better and can be damaging. We advise you to use a soft brush and to brush gently. It does not take force to remove plaque, and using a toothbrush too vigorously can damage your gums and cause them to recede (shrink away from your teeth), causing sensitivity and tooth wear. It takes between 12 and 24 hours for plaque to form on your teeth, so you don't need to brush more than twice a day and floss once a day.

How do you know when you've done a good job? A good test is that your teeth should feel like you've just had a professional cleaning. Your tongue is a great evaluator — just feel for smoothness at the gum line.

Is a powered toothbrush better than a manual one? An evidence-based study comparing all the research available found little difference between power and manual toothbrushes. The conclusion was that some powered toothbrushes with a rotation-oscillation action achieve a modest reduction in plaque and gingivitis compared to manual toothbrushes. But as we say, “it's not the brush, it's the hand that holds it.”

Come to our office for a demonstration. Any brush, whether electric or hand-powered, requires professional demonstration and training so that you know how to remove plaque correctly. Bring your toothbrush with you on your next visit to our office, so we can see your brushing technique and make sure you are doing it correctly for the most efficient plaque removal. And don't be embarrassed — nobody really knows how to brush effectively until they're shown!

Contact us today to schedule an appointment or to discuss your questions about tooth brushing and oral hygiene. You can also learn more by reading the Dear Doctor magazine article “Manual vs Powered Toothbrushes.”