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Posts for tag: cosmetic dentistry

By Briarcliff Center for Esthetic Dentistry
December 30, 2014
Category: Dental Procedures
AFutureSoBrightmdashTeethWhiteningFacts

If you cringe at the appearance of your less than pearly whites when you look in the mirror, you are not alone. A frequently requested cosmetic procedure, teeth whitening is a very successful and relatively inexpensive way to enhance your smile. We can determine which whitening treatment will work best for you after performing a basic oral examination in our office. When will it work and when won't it? Here's some background:

Teeth most commonly become stained or discolored due to surface (extrinsic) changes, the most common of which are dietary and smoking. Foods including red wine, coffee, and tea can cause extrinsic staining. Teeth can also commonly become discolored or stained due to intrinsic (internal) reasons, such as changes in the structure of enamel or dentin or by incorporation of chromogenic (color generating) material into tooth tissue during formation or after eruption.

  1. Toothpastes that claim to whiten teeth are only effective in removing plaque and other surface stains. Although most of these products contain mild abrasives that remove the plaque, they aren't capable of changing the underlying color of stained teeth.
  2. Tooth polishing by your dentist or dental hygienist is effective in removing superficial staining, but will not change tooth color.
  3. Teeth whitening systems work by bleaching, generally with the use of hydrogen peroxide. Using bleaching gels in custom made trays or whitening strips can be done at home, but is slow and the changes are gradual. We can perform quicker and more effective “power bleaching” in our dental office when precautions can be taken to ensure safety due to the higher concentrations of bleaching gels used. Teeth with intrinsic (internal) staining may need internal bleaching to whiten them and this can only be done in the dental office.
  4. Teeth whitening results fade over time, but optimally last from six months to two years. Taking care of your newly whitened teeth by avoiding the foods, beverages, and habits that cause staining will help them remain whiter for longer.
  5. If you have had previous cosmetic dentistry performed, including the placement of composite restorations, porcelain veneers, or crowns, teeth whitening may not be for you. Bleaching agents have little to no effect at all on the materials used to create these restorative products.

If you would like to discuss whitening your teeth with us, call today to make an appointment. To learn more about the various teeth whitening procedures, read the Dear Doctor magazine article “Teeth Whitening: Brighter, Lighter, Whiter…”

By Briarcliff Center for Esthetic Dentistry
September 18, 2014
Category: Dental Procedures
WithProperCareVeneersareaLong-TermOptionforStainedTeeth

Your otherwise beautiful smile has one noticeable flaw — one or more of your teeth are deeply discolored or stained. More than likely this staining is deep within the teeth, what we refer to as intrinsic staining. There are a number of reasons this can occur — from fillings or use of antibiotics, for example — and our first approach should be to attempt a whitening technique.

However, if that doesn't produce the desired result, porcelain laminate veneers are another option you might consider. Veneers are made of dental porcelain, a bio-compatible material that can be shaped and colored to closely match neighboring teeth. After a minimal amount of tooth reduction (removal of some of the enamel from the tooth surface) to prepare for the laminate, the veneers are then permanently bonded to the tooth surface and cover the discolored natural tooth. Besides changing the appearance of discolored or stained teeth, veneers can also be used to correct other imperfections such as chipped or misshapen teeth.

Patients, however, have a common question: how long will the veneers last? With proper care, veneers can last anywhere from seven years to more than twenty years. It's possible, though, to damage them — for example, you can break them if you bite down on something that goes beyond the porcelain's tolerance range, such as cracking nut shells with your teeth (not a good idea even for natural teeth!). You should also keep in mind that veneers are composed of inert, non-living material and are attached and surrounded by living gum tissue that can change over time. This process may eventually alter your appearance to the point that the veneer may need to be removed and reapplied to improve the look of your smile.

If a veneer is damaged, all is not necessarily lost. It may be possible to re-bond a loosened veneer or repair a chipped area. The worst case is replacement of the veneer altogether. Chances are, though, this will only happen after the veneer has already served you — and your smile — for many years.

If you would like more information on porcelain laminate veneers, please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation. You can also learn more about this topic by reading the Dear Doctor magazine article “Porcelain Veneers.”

By Briarcliff Center for Esthetic Dentistry
April 25, 2014
Category: Dental Procedures
ArePorcelainLaminateVeneersRightForYou

Porcelain laminate veneers are one of the innovative techniques dentistry has developed for restoring teeth to improve their color and shape so that they look as good as or better than the originals.

What are porcelain veneers? Porcelain is a ceramic material that is baked in a high-heat oven until it becomes glass-like. Your grandmother's antique china teacups are probably made of porcelain. Dental porcelains are especially made to perfectly mimic the color, reflectivity and translucency of natural tooth enamel. A veneer is a covering or shell, a false front; dental porcelains can be fashioned into veneers used to restore the enamel surfaces of teeth.

What is a laminate? A laminate is a structure created by uniting two or more layers of material together. Dental porcelain laminate veneers refer to the combination of tooth enamel bonding material and porcelain veneer.

When are porcelain laminate veneers used? Porcelain veneers are used to enhance the color of stained, darkened, decayed and heavily restored teeth. They are also used to: correct spaces between teeth; straighten slightly rotated teeth; correct problems in tooth shape and some bite problems. They can be good solutions for broken teeth or teeth that have been worn by habitual tooth grinding.

What is the process of placing the veneers? Room generally needs to be created to place a veneer; generally requiring about half a millimeter of reduction of tooth enamel. Artistic dental laboratory technicians fabricate veneers. About a week of laboratory time is usually needed to construct your veneers.

How do I know whether I will like the way my new veneers look? Computer imaging can be used to digitally replicate your teeth and create images of the proposed changes. Models of your teeth can be cast and changes can be made in white wax for your preview. Temporary veneers can also be fabricated as a test drive before the final veneers are fabricated.

How long will porcelain veneers last? Veneers can last 20 years or more. They are very strong but like glass, they can break if extreme force is applied to them. You should avoid such activities as opening bottles, cracking nuts, or biting into candy apples with your veneers.

How do I look after my new veneers? Once the veneers are placed, you should continue daily brushing and flossing. There is no higher incidence of decay around them than with your natural teeth. However, the more dental work you have in your mouth, the more vigilant you need to be. Of course, keeping your sugar consumption low helps to protect all of your teeth from decay.

Contact us today to schedule an appointment or to discuss your questions about porcelain laminate veneers. You can also learn more by reading the Dear Doctor magazine article “Smile Design Enhanced with Porcelain Veneers.”

By Briarcliff Center for Esthetic Dentistry
March 21, 2014
Category: Dental Procedures
HowWeDeterminetheBestWaytoFixYourSmile

We all know that dentistry can do amazing things these days to give you the smile you've always dreamed of. With the latest cosmetic and restorative dental techniques, it is possible to achieve amazingly natural-looking results. But how do we map out the best route to a better smile? And how do we know that the results will hold up over time?

Every individual has a unique set of conditions in his or her mouth and it is our job to figure out how you have come to your present state, dentally speaking. We need to correct or at least manage any factors that could risk the success of your treatment. These risk factors fall into four basic categories:

Periodontal Risk — This involves the condition of the structures that support your teeth, including your gum and bone tissue. It's important to establish good periodontal health before we perform any restorative or cosmetic procedures.

Biomechanical Risk — This has to do with the structural integrity of your teeth. We will look at whether any tooth structure has been lost due to decay, and take steps to reduce your susceptibility to decay if necessary.

Functional Risk — This relates to your bite: how your teeth, muscles and jaw joints are functioning. For example, do you have excessive tooth wear or joint pain? If so, you are at a higher risk in this category and we need to figure out why.

Aesthetic Risk — This is the most subjective of the categories as beauty is in the eye of the beholder. Still, if you display a lot of your teeth and gums when you smile, any issues you have (gum recession, for example) will be that much more visible and affect your smile more. We will have to take this into account when we plan your treatment.

Only when we have determined how best to minimize your risk in all four of these categories can we restore or enhance your smile in a way that will not only look great but also last as long as possible.

If you have any questions about cosmetic or restorative dental treatment, please contact us to schedule an appointment for a consultation.

By Briarcliff Center for Esthetic Dentistry
March 04, 2014
Category: Dental Procedures
SmileTransformationBeginsandEndsWithSmileDesign

Regardless of culture, the smile is a universal gesture of friendship and openness, and an important communication tool in your social and career relationships. But what if you’re not comfortable with your smile because of misaligned, damaged or missing teeth? That could have a dampening effect on your interactions with people and your own self-confidence.

Cosmetic dentistry can change all that — we have an arsenal of treatments that can rejuvenate your smile. We must first, though, develop a design plan, often involving multiple dental disciplines. It will definitely involve you — your desires, expectations and choices.

It begins with a thought-provoking discussion with our office. Generalities — “I want a beautiful smile” — aren’t enough. Effective planning begins with a clear perspective about your teeth: What do you like or dislike about them? If you could change anything, what would it be? These initial discussions help us specify your expectations.

While the initial discussion envisions the future, the next step focuses on the present — the current condition of your teeth, mouth and entire facial structure. This requires a comprehensive examination to identify any health issues like tooth decay, periodontal gum disease or bone loss. We must also take in the “big picture,” like the shape of your face, out-of-balance features (asymmetries), skin complexion, eye shape and color, or the form and posture of your lips.

Considering all these factors, we then develop a treatment plan with specifics on how to achieve the desired transformation. We will offer our prognosis for what we believe is achievable and maintainable for your specific situation. Here we provide various models, perhaps even including computer simulation, to depict your future smile. In the end, we create a workable plan that meets both reality and your expectations.

With the design plan completed, we can then harness all the techniques and materials available to achieve it. These range from less invasive procedures like whitening, tooth reshaping, cosmetic bonding or porcelain veneers, to more involved restorations like crowns, bridgework or dental implants. In some cases, orthodontics may be necessary to correct bad bites or other malformations of your oral structures.

Smile design ensures we’re employing the right techniques for your particular situation. It all serves the end goal — a new smile that can transform your life.

If you would like more information on smile design, please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation. You can also learn more about this topic by reading the Dear Doctor magazine article “Beautiful Smiles by Design.”