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Posts for category: Dental Procedures

By Briarcliff Center for Esthetic Dentistry
May 13, 2018
Category: Dental Procedures
ProvisionalRestorationsletyouTryoutYourNewSmileFirst

Transforming your smile with veneers, crowns or other restorations could be a life-changing decision. To help make that change a successful one, it’s possible to fit you with a kind of temporary restoration that allows you to “try out” your new look and even make modifications before you receive the permanent one.

Referred to as a prototype or provisional restoration, it’s different from other temporary, “one-size-fits-all” restorations that serve mainly a functional purpose until the permanent restoration is ready. By contrast, a provisional restoration is a customized “blueprint” of the final restoration so you can better communicate with your dentist to get what you want.

Provisional restorations are test runs — they help both patient and dentist evaluate three key areas critical to ultimate success:

Your ┬áSmile — with provisional restorations you can get input from others (and from what you see in the mirror) regarding tooth coloring and how it blends with other teeth, the attractiveness of the crown shapes, and whether the teeth appear proportional and balanced with the gums.

Your Facial Appearance — changing the look of teeth may also alter overall facial appearance. Do the new teeth fit well with the lips and other facial features? Do they change the smile line, and does it appear harmonious with the rest of the face?

Your Mouth Function — There’s more to teeth, of course, than how they look. Teeth are essential for biting, chewing and speaking. So, can you perform these tasks comfortably with the provisional restoration?

While you’re wearing the provisional restoration, we’ll discuss these and other areas, what might look or work better, or if you feel we’ve hit the mark just right. We can then modify or verify our specifications with the dental lab creating the final restoration.

Of course, a provisional restoration will allow you to function normally like other temporary options. But their custom detail serves a higher purpose — to help us improve your future smile.

If you would like more information on customized temporary restorations, please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation. You can also learn more about this topic by reading the Dear Doctor magazine article “Concepts in Temporary Restorations.”

By Briarcliff Center for Esthetic Dentistry
May 03, 2018
Category: Dental Procedures

What your dentist in Briarcliff Manor wants you to knowrestorative dentistry

When you smile, do you show a lot of large, old, metal fillings to the world? Does your smile contain damaged, broken teeth? Are you missing teeth entirely? If you answered yes to these questions, it’s time for you to investigate dental crowns and bridges. Dr. Michael Teitelbaum at Briarcliff Center for Esthetic Dentistry in Briarcliff Manor, NY, wants to share the facts about crowns and bridges and what they can do for your smile.

A dental crown is a strong restorative treatment that covers the entire visible part of your tooth. It encases your tooth completely, holding your tooth together. A dental crown can actually strengthen your tooth. When you bite down, the strong biting and chewing forces are spread evenly across the surface of your tooth, protecting your tooth from damage.

You can choose from several durable materials for your new crown, each with its own benefits. For example:

  • If you want the most aesthetically pleasing, natural-looking crown, full porcelain is the perfect choice. That’s because porcelain reflects light just like your natural teeth.
  • If you want the strength of metal, but still want a natural look, a porcelain-fused-to-metal crown is a great choice. It’s not quite as natural-looking because of the metal foundation, but it still blends into your smile.
  • If you want a conventional, less expensive choice, full gold is perfect. It’s well suited to teeth that don’t show when you smile, and offers a strong restorative option.

If you want to replace missing teeth, dental bridges can work perfectly. A bridge utilizes the teeth on both sides of the space to support the bridge. These teeth, called abutments, are prepared and crowned to hold the bridge. The bridge holds prosthetic teeth, called pontics, which take the place of your missing teeth. After the bridge is cemented, your smile is complete, and your full chewing function is restored.

Crowns and bridges can make a difference in your smile by restoring strength and beauty. They can give you a smile you can be proud of. For more information about dental crowns and bridgework, call Dr. Teitelbaum at Briarcliff Center for Esthetic Dentistry in Briarcliff Manor, NY. Call today!

By Briarcliff Center for Esthetic Dentistry
May 03, 2018
Category: Dental Procedures
Tags: dental implants  
ReplaceTeethforBetterSpeech

The month of May has been designated “Better Speech & Hearing Month” by the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association. Why would this be of interest to dental professionals? Because teeth are vital for good speech, and missing teeth can make it very hard to speak properly.

Speech is all about sounds, and forming sounds correctly requires proper positioning of oral structures such as the lips, tongue and teeth. For example, there are some words that are almost impossible to pronounce correctly without touching your tongue to your teeth. In fact, one of the hardest words to say without teeth…is teeth!

Missing teeth can affect speech indirectly as well, by reducing self-confidence. People who are missing front teeth often develop the habit of talking behind their hand or mumbling to avoid revealing the gap in their smile. Not being able to speak clearly and confidently can affect not only your appearance, but also your job prospects and social life. So what can you do about missing teeth?

Dental implants are today’s preferred tooth-replacement method. Implants are small titanium posts that are inserted in the jaw bone beneath your gums. They serve as “roots” to hold realistic-looking prosthetic (artificial) teeth in place. Implants can be used to replace one tooth, a group of teeth, or an entire row of teeth (upper or lower). Sometimes a dental implant can be placed the same day a failing tooth is removed so that you won’t need a second surgical procedure.

The healthy natural teeth on either side of the gap can also be used to support one or more replacement teeth. This method, called bridgework, can be used to replace a single tooth or several teeth in a row. Another option is removable dentures, which do not stay in the mouth all the time.

Each of these options has its benefits and risks. We’d be happy to discuss all of them in detail and help you decide which would be best in your own situation. To learn more about tooth replacement, please contact us or schedule a consultation. You can also read the Dear Doctor magazine articles “Dental Implant Surgery” and “New Teeth in One Day.”

By Briarcliff Center for Esthetic Dentistry
April 23, 2018
Category: Dental Procedures
RemovingTeethCouldImprovetheOutcomeforaCrowdedBite

The primary goal of dental care is to preserve teeth. But there are circumstances in which removing a tooth, even a relatively healthy one, could prove best in the long run.

A malocclusion (poor bite) related to crowding might fit such a circumstance. Crowding occurs when the size of the jaw is too small for the teeth coming in. With not enough space, some teeth could erupt out of their proper positions. Removing certain teeth frees up space to eventually allow braces or other orthodontic devices to re-align the teeth.

The teeth most frequently removed are the first bicuspids, located between the cuspid (the "eyeteeth" directly under the eyes) and the back teeth, and the second premolar. Removing these won't normally affect appearance or functionality once orthodontic or cosmetic treatments are complete.

Because of the mechanics of jaw development it might be necessary to perform these extractions several years before orthodontic treatment. This could create another potential problem: the time lag could adversely affect bone health.

This is because bone, as living tissue, has a life cycle with cells forming, functioning and then dissolving, and new cells taking their place. When teeth are chewing or in contact with each other they generate force that travels through the tooth roots to the bone and stimulates cell growth at a healthy replacement rate.

But when a tooth is missing, so is this stimulation. This slows the replacement rate and eventually leads to decreased bone volume. Too much bone loss could create obstacles for orthodontic treatment or a future dental implant.

To avoid this, the dentist will often place a bone graft with processed bone mineral within the empty tooth socket right after extraction. The graft serves as a scaffold for bone cells to grow upon. The graft (plus any other added growth boosters) can help maintain a healthy level of bone volume to facilitate future orthodontic or restorative treatments.

Since targeted extraction for orthodontics is time-sensitive, you should have your child's bite evaluated by an orthodontist by age 7 to see if any action is necessary. The earlier a malocclusion is detected, the more likely a more attractive and healthy smile will be the ultimate outcome.

If you would like more information on correcting poor bites, please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation. You can also learn more about this topic by reading the Dear Doctor magazine article “Tooth Removal for Orthodontic Reasons.”

By Briarcliff Center for Esthetic Dentistry
April 10, 2018
Category: Dental Procedures
Tags: clear aligners  
ClearAlignersMakeitEasierforTeenagerstohaveTheirTeethStraightened

Braces can change a person's life — not just their appearance but their dental health as well. To be honest, though, wearing braces are, well, kind of a drag — especially for teenagers.

Braces can be restrictive and confining; you'll also have to give up certain favorite foods for a while. But more than any of that, they're just plain unattractive. Even being able to choose colors for the brackets and elastic bands can't fully ease a teenager's embarrassment when they smile.

There is, however, an alternative to braces: clear aligners. And they could make orthodontic treatment during this difficult phase of their life much easier to handle.

Clear aligners are a set of clear plastic trays that can be taken in and out of the mouth. Each of the custom-designed trays is slightly smaller than the previous one in the series. After wearing the first tray for a couple of weeks (at least 20 to 22 hours a day), the patient switches to the next tray in the series. They repeat this process until they've worn all the trays. The gradual change from tray to tray moves the teeth to the desired position.

Clear aligners have some distinct advantages over braces, especially for younger patients. They can be removed for cleaning or for a rare special event. They don't limit movement as much as braces. And, they're nearly invisible — other people may not even notice them. And newer aligners are now designed with tiny “power ridges” that increase their movement capabilities. This has made them more useful for teenagers with complicated bite problems and other issues.

There are cases, though, where braces may be the better choice: where you need more control over tooth movement or the patient needs jaw surgery to achieve proper tooth alignment. And their removability could be an issue if the patient won't leave them in their mouth for the necessary time each day.

To find out if clear aligners might be a viable option for your teenager, visit us for a complete orthodontic examination. We can then discuss your best option — clear aligners or braces — to achieve the most desirable outcome for your teenager.

If you would like more information on treating bite problems in teenagers with clear aligners, please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation. You can also learn more about this topic by reading the Dear Doctor magazine article “Clear Aligners for teens.”