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By Briarcliff Center for Esthetic Dentistry
January 23, 2020
Category: Oral Health
Tags: Tooth Replacement  

A genetic condition, periodontal disease, dental decay, and injury can all result in permanent tooth loss. Fortunately, here at the Briarcliff Center for Esthetic Dentistry in Briarcliff Manor, NY, Dr. Michael Teitelbaum offers robust solutions that repair your smile, your appearance, and overall confidence. At our dental office, whatever the source of your tooth loss may be, our staff will help you take the proper steps towards full restoration. Whether you have one or more missing teeth, leaving the problem untreated can be detrimental to your oral health. Visit our office today to discuss your tooth replacement options.

Your Tooth Replacement Options

At our Briarcliff Manor office, Dr. Michael Teitelbaum can improve the look and health of your smile by replacing missing teeth with the following:

  • Dentures - a removable oral appliance that is made from acrylic resin and metal to resemble your natural teeth and gums.
  • Dental Bridge - literally bridges the gap between the missing tooth and your artificial restoration by using anchoring teeth, abutment teeth, and either a false tooth or several false teeth.
  • Dental Implants - this permanent solution uses a surgical component that acts as an anchor to support a crown, bridge, or denture. Although dental implants take a bit of time to install, they provide unmatched stability and longevity.

All of those restorative services can replace an individual tooth or multiple teeth.

Benefits of Replacing Missing Teeth

These are only a few advantages of replacing missing teeth with one of our assorted restorative treatment options at the Briarcliff Center for Esthetic Dentistry in Briarcliff Manor, NY:

  • Preserves jawbone health
  • Maintain facial structure
  • Enhance the function of your bite
  • Revitalize the aesthetics of your smile
  • Protect surrounding teeth from injury

Need Dental Work? Give Us a Call

To learn more about dentures, dental bridges, dental implants, and any of the other services that we provide, visit our website. For questions or to schedule an appointment, call our Briarcliff Manor, NY, dental office at (914) 941-2000.

By Briarcliff Center for Esthetic Dentistry
January 23, 2020
Category: Dental Procedures
EarlyActionNeededtoSaveYourToothfromRootResorption

Along with the gums, your teeth’s roots help stabilize them. Without them your teeth couldn’t handle the normal biting forces you encounter every day. That’s why a rare condition called root resorption must be treated promptly: this gradual breakdown and dissolving of root structure could eventually cause you to lose your tooth.

Resorption is normal in primary (“baby”) teeth giving way for permanent teeth or sometimes during orthodontic treatment. But the form of resorption we’re referring to in permanent teeth isn’t normal, and is highly destructive.

The condition begins in most cases outside the tooth and works its way in, usually at the gum line around the cervical or “neck-like” region of the tooth (hence the term external cervical resorption or ECR). ECR produces pink spots on the teeth in its early stages: these are spots of weakened enamel filled with pink-colored cells that cause the actual damage. The cells create cavity-like areas that can continue to enlarge.

We don’t fully understand what causes ECR, but there seems to be links with excessive force during orthodontics, tooth trauma (especially to the gum ligaments), tooth grinding habits or internal bleaching procedures. However, most people with these problems don’t develop ECR, so the exact mechanism remains a bit of a mystery.

The good news, though, is that we can treat ECR effectively, provided we discover it before it inflicts too much damage. That’s why regular dental visits are important, coupled with your own observation of anything out of the ordinary and immediate dental follow-up.

If the affected area is relatively small, we may be able to remove the cells causing the damage and repair the area with a tooth-colored filling. If it appears the pulp (the tooth’s innermost layer) is involved, we may need to perform a root canal treatment to remove infected tissue and fill the empty space with a special filling. You may also need other procedures to reduce the chances of gum recession around the affected tooth.

Proactive dental care is your best insurance against losing a tooth to root resorption. So keep an eye on your teeth and see your dentist regularly to keep your teeth and gums healthy.

If you would like more information on the signs and treatments for root resorption, please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation. You can also learn more about this topic by reading the Dear Doctor magazine article “Root Resorption: An Unusual Phenomenon.”

By Briarcliff Center for Esthetic Dentistry
January 18, 2020
Category: Dental Procedures
Tags: porcelain veneers  
ItTakesArtistryandSkilltoAchievetheRightColorBalanceforYourVeneers

Getting a new smile doesn’t have to be an elaborate affair. If your teeth have minor to moderate chips, stains or tooth gaps, dental veneers could be the answer. These thin wafers of dental porcelain mask tooth imperfections and completely change your smile’s dynamic—and without a huge impact to your wallet.

To achieve that effect, though, your personal set of veneers will require the expertise of both your dentist and a dental lab technician to design and create your veneers. And while there are numerous considerations in achieving a truly life-like appearance with veneers, one of the most important is their color.

We always associate the color white with teeth. And while it is the dominant hue, actual tooth color is more complex. An individual tooth is comprised of multiple shades and tints, that range in variation from its biting edge to the gums. Likewise, tooth color in general can differ from person to person.

Your dentist must take these individual color variations into account while designing your new veneers, especially if you’ll be getting them for some but not for all your teeth. In that case, it’s important for the veneer color to blend seamlessly with the color of your natural teeth without veneers.

Your new smile expectations and desires are also important and should be considered when designing veneer coloring. For instance, do you want a more natural look—or would you prefer a smile with more “dazzle”? This could have an impact on color.

Your dentist takes all of this information (including your input) and communicates it clearly to the dental lab technician creating the veneers. That process is a combination of both science and artistry, using a variety of techniques to achieve an accurate, life-like texture and color result. For example, a technician may paint the edges of the veneers with a ceramic paste that when cured produces a life-like translucency.

This meticulous attention to color detail is necessary to create beautiful veneers that look natural. If the color is right, you’re sure to enjoy the change your veneers bring to your smile for many years to come.

If you would like more information on transforming your smile with dental veneers, please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation. You can also learn more about this topic by reading the Dear Doctor magazine article “Porcelain Veneers: Your Smile—Better Than Ever.”

By Briarcliff Center for Esthetic Dentistry
January 13, 2020
Category: Dental Procedures
Tags: veneers  
AvoidPermanentToothAlterationWithNoPrepVeneers

Looking for an affordable way to beautify your smile? The answer could be dental veneers, thin wafers of porcelain bonded to the front of teeth to hide stains, chips or other deformities. Custom-made veneers can look so much like natural teeth in color and shape, it’s hard to tell they’re there.

To achieve this realism, though, it’s usually necessary to alter the tooth first. That’s because a veneer can look unnaturally bulky when bonded to an unprepared tooth. To compensate, we often remove a slight amount of surface enamel so that the veneer’s width won’t be unattractive.

This alteration doesn’t harm a tooth as long as it has a veneer or some other restoration to protect any exposed underlayer of dentin. And because the alteration is permanent, the tooth will need a veneer or other protective covering from then on.

In recent years, though, two new options called no-prep or minimal-prep veneers make it possible to avoid or at least decrease the amount of enamel reduction needed. This is possible thanks mainly to improvements in the strength composition of the dental material used in them.

As a result, these veneers are as thin as contact lenses and may only require slight enamel reshaping to smooth out the sides of the teeth for a better fit. And, unlike traditional veneers, you can have them removed and return to your original look without the need for another restoration.

Low prep veneers are best suited for patients with teeth that are small (or appear small), worn, narrow or only slightly stained or misshapen. Someone with oversized teeth, on the other hand, or that jut forward may still need extensive tooth preparation or even orthodontic work beforehand.

If you do meet the criteria, though, you may be able to benefit from low prep veneers. Because there’s no tooth preparation, you may not even need local anesthesia. And you can reverse the restoration if you desire without harm to your teeth.

To find out if you might benefit from these new kinds of veneers, see us for an initial dental examination to see if you qualify. It’s your first step toward a more beautiful and confident smile.

If you would like more information on no-prep or minimal-prep veneers, please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation. You can also learn more about this topic by reading the Dear Doctor magazine article “No-Prep Porcelain Veneers.”

By Briarcliff Center for Esthetic Dentistry
January 08, 2020
Category: Dental Procedures
HeresWhatyouNeedtoKnowaboutaRootCanalTreatment

A root canal treatment is a common procedure performed by dentists and endodontists (specialists for inner tooth problems). If you're about to undergo this tooth-saving procedure, here's what you need to know.

The goal of a root canal treatment is to stop tooth decay within a tooth's interior and minimize any damage to the tooth and underlying bone. This is done by accessing the tooth's pulp and root canals (tiny passageways traveling through the tooth roots to the bone) by drilling into the biting surface of a back tooth or the "tongue" side of a front tooth.

First, though, we numb the tooth and surrounding area with local anesthesia so you won't feel any pain during the procedure.  We'll also place a small sheet of vinyl or rubber called a dental dam that isolates the affected tooth from other teeth to minimize the spread of infection.

After gaining access inside the tooth we use special instruments to remove all of the diseased tissue, often with the help of a dental microscope to view the interior of tiny root canals. Once the pulp and root canals have been cleared, we'll flush the empty spaces with an antibacterial solution.

After any required reshaping, we'll fill the pulp chamber and root canals with a special filling called gutta-percha. This rubberlike, biocompatible substance conforms easily to the shape of these inner tooth structures. The filling preserves the tooth from future infection, with the added protection of adhesive cement to seal it in.

Afterward, you may have a few days of soreness that's often manageable with mild pain relievers. You'll return for a follow-up visit and possibly a more permanent filling for the access hole. It's also likely you'll receive a permanent crown for the tooth to restore it and further protect it from future fracture.

Without this vital treatment, you could very well lose your tooth to the ravages of decay. The time and any minor discomfort you may experience are well worth the outcome.

If you would like more information on treating tooth decay, please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation. You can also learn more about this topic by reading the Dear Doctor magazine article “Root Canal Treatment: What You Need to Know.”





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