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Posts for category: Oral Health

By Briarcliff Center for Esthetic Dentistry
January 05, 2013
Category: Oral Health
DeterminingYourRiskForToothDecaymdashAndReversingIt

Dental decay is an infectious and very common disease, but it's also very preventable. Today's dentistry has many tools at its disposal to accurately determine your risk for tooth decay, lower it, turn it around, and completely prevent it. What's more, we can even reverse early decay. You might never have to see or hear the drill again.

Striking the right balance between factors that promote oral health and those that cause disease is of the utmost importance. And knowing whether or not you have indicators of disease or risk for tooth decay is a great place to start.

We will scientifically calculate your risk for tooth decay by:

  1. Recording and monitoring your oral and dental health: Our risk assessment/evaluation form allows us to gather information about critical dental health habits. Oral hygiene habits, use of fluoride toothpaste, tobacco smoking, frequent snacking on sugary foods and beverages, and past experience of decay are all examples of disease indicators that will help gauge your level of risk. For example, using fluoride toothpaste decreases your risk, but smoking and between-meal snacking increases it.
  2. Testing for decay producing bacteria: You've probably heard of dental bacterial plaque, the biofilm that sticks to your teeth, forming in the tiny little grooves on the biting surfaces of the teeth where decay starts (and along the gum line). Today, acid-producing bacteria responsible for causing decay can be tested by simply sampling your biofilm on a swab, and placing it in a meter to accurately determine acid-producing activity. A high number indicates high risk. You can see it for yourself in less than a minute.
  3. Saliva testing: A simple history will tell us whether your mouth is dry or moist most of the time. A saliva test will tell us if your saliva is acidic or neutral. A dry acidic mouth promotes decay, while a moist neutral mouth with healthy saliva promotes health. Measuring salivary “pH,” the measure of acidity, is another factor for determining your risk for decay and reversing it. Special rinses can help reduce decay-producing bacteria and reduce acidity.
  4. Very early decay detection: Modern ultra-low-dosage x-ray equipment allows us to determine the very earliest signs of decay. Decay that is detectable with the naked eye (or feel with a dentist's instrument, an explorer) is already at an advanced stage. Catching the disease very early with the help of this sophisticated equipment can allow us to reverse early decay before it has even turned into cavities. It can actually be reversed with remineralizing fluids, rinses that put calcium back into the tooth surfaces reforming and hardening them.

This is a new and exciting era in the fight against tooth decay and we have all the tools to determine your decay risk and reverse it.

If you would like us to determine your risk for tooth decay, please call the office to schedule an appointment. To read more about disease indicators and risk factors for dental caries, read the Dear Doctor magazine article “Tooth Decay: How To Assess Your Risk.”

By Briarcliff Center for Esthetic Dentistry
December 14, 2012
Category: Oral Health
Tags: oral health   tmj   tmd  
CommonWaysWeCanTreatYourTemporomandibularDisorderTMD

Temporomandibular Disorder (TMD), which was formerly known as Temporomandibular Joint Disorder (TMJ), is an interesting condition because it can be hard to diagnose and often mimics many other conditions. It arises when there are problems inside the temporomandibular joint, and the muscles attached to it, causing pain. When treating TMD, we typically start by relieving the symptoms of pain and discomfort with heat, mild pain medications, a diet of soft foods, and some simple jaw exercises. We feel that it is critical to address your pain issues as soon as possible before preceding any further with treatment.

Once we have provided some pain relief and after having completed a thorough history and examination, we can move to the next phase of treatment. This may include the introduction of a bite guard or some form of oral appliance therapy. A bite guard is an unobtrusive yet rigid plastic horseshoe-shaped appliance that fits snuggly over the biting surfaces of the upper teeth. When in place and properly adjusted, this custom-made appliance allows your muscles and therefore jaw joints to relax. And it will prevent you from grinding your teeth, another contributing factor to TMD. We will probably ask you to wear it when sleeping or in times when you are feeling stressed when clenching or grinding habits may be active. We may also suggest that you obtain some relaxation therapy and/or biofeedback from a licensed therapist, as this can prove helpful in treating TMD.

If you have suffered from frequent jaw pain in the past and suspect that you may have TMD, please let us know so that we can address it at your next appointment. Or if you are currently in constant or severe pain, contact us immediately to schedule an appointment. You can learn more about the signs, symptoms, and treatment options for TMD by reading “TMD — Understanding The Great Imposter.”

By Briarcliff Center for Esthetic Dentistry
December 05, 2012
Category: Oral Health
TestingYourOralHealthIQ

Everyone agrees that education is an important part of personal growth. However, one area of study that often slips through the cracks centers on oral healthcare basics. And whether or not we all do it as often as we should, most people know they should brush and floss their teeth daily. But other than that, do you feel you are knowledgeable and thus have a healthy dental IQ?

We have developed a quick and easy oral health IQ test to help you self-assess your expertise. The answers are listed at the bottom of this article.

The Quiz

  1. What has been the largest, single factor influencing the decline in tooth decay over the past 40 years in America?
    1. Fluoridated water
    2. Fluoridated toothpaste
    3. Flossing
    4. Sealants
  2. Your dentists can help treat which of the following problem(s)?
    1. Halitosis (bad breath)
    2. Snoring and sleep apnea
    3. Headaches, Temporomandibular Disorder (TMD), or Temporomandibular Joint Dysfunction
    4. All of the above
  3. The most important aspect of brushing your teeth is...?
    1. The brand of toothpaste you use
    2. Your brushing technique and frequency
    3. The brand of your toothbrush
    4. Using an electric toothbrush
  4. At a minimum, how often should you have a thorough dental evaluation?
    1. Every six months
    2. Once a year
    3. Every five years
    4. Only if you are experiencing pain
  5. At a minimum, how often should you have your teeth professionally cleaned?
    1. Every six months
    2. Once a year
    3. Every five years
    4. It depends on your age and oral health

Want to learn more?

Contact us today to discuss your questions or to schedule a consultation. You can also learn more by reading the Dear Doctor article, “Oral Hygiene Behavior.”

The Answers

1) a = fluoridated water, 2) d = all of the above, 3) b = your brushing technique and frequency, 4) b = once a year, 5) d = It depends on your age and oral health

By Briarcliff Center for Esthetic Dentistry
November 08, 2012
Category: Oral Health
Tags: oral health   nutrition   sugar  
SugarsTheGoodandtheBad

You probably know that tooth decay results when the bacteria in your mouth release acids after consuming sugars. After you eat sugars, particularly the type of sugar known as sucrose, increased acid in your mouth begins to dissolve the enamel and dentin in your teeth, and you end up with cavities.

What are the Types of Sugars?
Modern diets include several types of sugars. Most of these are fermented by oral bacteria, producing acids that are harmful to teeth.

  • Sucrose (commonly known as sugar)
  • Glucose (released from starch consumption)
  • Lactose (milk sugar) — Less acid is produced from this type of sugar
  • Fructose (found naturally in fruit and also added to many processed foods)
  • Maltose

Recommended intake of “free sugars” is no more than 10 teaspoons per day. Note that a can of soda contains over 6 teaspoons! Soft drinks are the largest source of sugar consumption in the U.S. In 2003, for example, Americans drank an average of 52 gallons of soft drinks. Average per capita consumption of all sugars in the U.S. was 141.5 pounds (64.3 kg) one of the highest levels in the world.

Sugar substitute xylitol (which is chemically similar to sugar but does not cause decay) can be part of a preventive program to reduce or control tooth decay. Chewing gum sweetened with xylitol stimulates saliva flow and helps protect against decay.

Sugars Released from Starches
Starches are foods like rice, potatoes, or bread. When you eat refined starches, such as white bread and rice, enzymes in your saliva release glucose. However, these foods have a lower potential to produce decay than foods with added sugars. When sugars are added to starchy foods, as in baked products and breakfast cereals, the potential for decay increases.

Less refined starches such as whole grains require more chewing and stimulate secretion of saliva, which protects from harmful acids.

The Case for Fruit
Fresh fruit has not been shown to produce cavities, so it makes sense to eat them instead of sugary desserts and snacks. Dried fruit is more of a problem because the drying process releases free sugars.

Contact us today to schedule an appointment to discuss your questions about diet and oral health. You can also learn more by reading the Dear Doctor magazine article “Nutrition & Oral Health.”

By Briarcliff Center for Esthetic Dentistry
October 31, 2012
Category: Oral Health
Tags: sleep apnea   snoring   sleep  
5ReasonsWeCanHelpYourSnoringandOtherSleepRelatedBreathingDisordersSRBDs

Snoring and other sleeping disorders impact between 50 and 70 million Americans each year. However, did you know that our office can help when it comes to diagnosing and treating sleeping disorders? For this reason, we have put together this list to highlight how we can have a positive impact on your snoring.

  1. Many people are surprised to learn that physician training is lacking and very slowly evolving in the area of sleep related breathing disorders. Therefore, there is limited public and medical awareness. The American Academy of Sleep Medicine (AASM) has acknowledged that properly trained dentists are the first line of therapy for treating mild to moderate sleep apnea effectively.
  2. Because we see our patients on a more regular basis than many primary-care physicians, we dentists are in a unique position to identify and/or detect a SRBD. However, for us to accomplish this, you must share the facts about your sleeping habits and issues related to breathing. In other words, do not be embarrassed to let us know that your spouse, sleeping partner or family complain to you about your snoring!
  3. When it comes to treating complications associated with Oral Appliance Therapy (OAT) used in managing Sleep Related Breathing Disorders (SRBD), dentists are the primary professionals who are specifically trained to create, fit, adjust, monitor and treat any complications associated with a mouthpiece (oral appliance).
  4. Did you know that dentists help identify the approximately 90% of misdiagnosed cases of patients suffering from a SRBD? Well, it is true. We play a critical role in diagnosing and treating these patients.
  5. Another reason why it is much easier for us to diagnose and treat these problems is because the core of our training is centered upon the oral cavity, mouth and parts of the upper airway — the very areas where your snoring and SRBDs occur.

If you suffer from snoring or any other Sleep Related Breathing Disorder, it is imperative that you seek and obtain treatment. Ignoring these problems can lead to issues such as: an irregular heartbeat, heart attacks, high blood pressure, and other forms of heart disease as well as strokes and impotence. Contact us today to discuss your questions about snoring or to schedule an appointment. You can also learn more about snoring and sleep disorders when you continue reading the Dear Doctor magazine article “Sleep Disorders & Dentistry.”